Trumpet Fingering Chart for All 12 Major Scales

Get creative and find ways to practice all 12 patterns up and down. Start slowly and keep time with a metronome while banging the valves down as firmly as possible without moving the horn around your face. I recommend playing each note in the scale first as a whole note, then as a half note, and then finally as quarter note before increasing the tempo.

Once you can play all the major scales up and back down from memory, then it’s time to try playing simple melodies like “Hot Cross Buns” in each key.

Key
The “o” characters stand for an open valve, while the “x” characters stand for a closed valve. For each note the valves are listed 1st, 2nd, and 3rd valve from left to right

C major scale trumpet fingering chart:

C / D / E / F / G / A / B / C
ooo / xox / xxo / xoo / ooo / xxo / oxo / ooo

C# major scale trumpet fingering chart:

C# / D# / E# / F# / G# / A# / B# / C#
xxx / oxx / xoo / oxo / oxx / xoo / ooo / xxo

D major scale trumpet fingering chart:

D / E / F# / G / A / B / C# / D
xox / xxo / oxo / ooo / xxo / oxo / xxo / xoo

Eb major scale trumpet fingering chart:

Eb / F / G / Ab / Bb / C / D / Eb
oxx / xoo / ooo / oxx / xoo / ooo / xoo / oxo

E major scale trumpet fingering chart:

E / F# / G# / A / B / C# / D# / E
xxo / oxo / oxx / xxo / oxo / xxo / oxo / ooo

F major scale trumpet fingering chart:

F / G / A / Bb / C / D / E / F
xoo / ooo / xxo / xoo / ooo / xoo / ooo / xoo

F# major scale trumpet fingering chart:

F# / G# / A# / B / C# / D# / E# / F#
oxo / oxx / xoo / oxo / xxo / oxo / xoo / oxo

G major scale trumpet fingering chart:

G / A / B / C / D / E / F# / G
ooo / xxo / oxo / ooo / xoo / ooo / oxo / ooo

Ab major scale trumpet fingering chart:

Ab / Bb / C / Db / Eb / F / G / Ab
oxx / xoo / ooo / xxx / oxx / xoo / ooo / oxx (lower octave)
oxx / xoo / ooo / xxo / oxo / xoo / ooo / oxx (upper octave)

A major scale trumpet fingering chart:

A / B / C# / D / E / F# / G# / A
xxo / oxo / xxx / xox / xxo / oxo / oxx / xxo (lower octave)
xxo / oxo / xxo / xoo / ooo / oxo / oxx / xxo (upper octave)

Bb major scale trumpet fingering chart:

Bb / C / D / Eb / F / G / A / Bb
xoo / ooo / xox / oxx / xoo / ooo / xxo / xoo

B major scale trumpet fingering chart:

B / C# / D# / E / F# / G# / A# / B
oxo / xxx / oxx / xxo / oxo / oxx / xoo / oxo

If you want more information on practicing major and minor scales on the trumpet, make sure that you own J.B. Arban’s Complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet (affiliate link). It is unofficially known as the trumpeter’s bible and should be part of every trumpet players resource library.

 

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93 comments for “Trumpet Fingering Chart for All 12 Major Scales

  1. Huon Parkes
    May 7, 2017 at 6:55 am

    Thanks, really lovely website. My braces hinder me from getting middle-upper register notes and some of the scales boggle me, this website you have here has clarified it beautifully, again Thank you 🙂

    • May 16, 2017 at 12:13 pm

      Thanks for the wonderful comments and keep up the good work! ~SW

  2. Roman Schlichter
    April 27, 2017 at 7:27 pm

    Could you make a page for the blues scales

    • April 28, 2017 at 12:34 pm

      Yeah man, that’s a great suggestion, thanks! ~SW

  3. April 14, 2017 at 4:53 pm

    are you sure these notes are right.

    • April 15, 2017 at 9:52 am

      Hi Olin,

      These fingerings are correct for the C-sharp Major scale, the fourth degree would be an F-sharp – depress only the middle valve (oxo),

      C# / D# / E# / F# / G# / A# / B# / C#
      xxx / oxx / xoo / oxo / oxx / xoo / ooo / xxo

      Keep practicing and you’ll get it sooner than later, I promise!

      ~SW

  4. April 14, 2017 at 4:43 pm

    i keep on messing up on the 4th note of c# scale

    • April 15, 2017 at 9:53 am

      Hi Olin,

      These fingerings are correct for the C-sharp Major scale, the fourth degree would be an F-sharp – depress only the middle valve (oxo),

      C# / D# / E# / F# / G# / A# / B# / C#
      xxx / oxx / xoo / oxo / oxx / xoo / ooo / xxo

      Keep practicing and you’ll get it sooner than later, I promise!

      ~SW

  5. Roman Schlichter
    March 9, 2017 at 4:25 pm

    Thanks I had a scale test I didn’t study for but thanks to you I aced it

    • March 10, 2017 at 3:05 am

      Roman, Thanks for your comment, I’m thrilled that you were able to make use the information posted here! All the best, ~SW

  6. Leo
    February 28, 2017 at 9:00 am

    Thank you very much SCOT for such a great work done. I am Leo junior and am trying to learn the trumpet on my own. Can you please give me some links to some great recordings so that I can listen and follow. And also some great trumpet players I can follow. Secondly I also need a link I can get the keys for hymnals. Thank you very much. Hoping to hear from you.

  7. February 23, 2017 at 9:25 am

    awesome

  8. Trinity
    February 3, 2017 at 4:41 am

    I’m a middle school student thx so much I need to know all of them for high school

    • February 6, 2017 at 8:04 am

      I’m so happy that I could help you out! Keep practicing! ~SW

  9. Rahim
    December 22, 2016 at 2:14 pm

    what is the Db and the Gb major scale please

    • December 23, 2016 at 9:46 am

      Hi Rahim,

      Thanks for the comment.

      The D-flat major scale is achieved with the same fingerings that are provided above for the C-sharp major scale. Here is the enharmonic information that you are missing,

      Db / Eb / F / Gb / Ab / Bb / C / Db
      xxx / oxx / xoo / oxo / oxx / xoo / ooo / xxo

      And then you’ll find that the G-flat major scale utilizes the same fingerings as the F-sharp major scale, also listed above. Here are the note names in the key of G-flat,

      Gb / Ab / Bb / Cb / Db / Eb / F / Gb
      oxo / oxx / xoo / oxo / xxo / oxo / xoo / oxo

      Notice that the sounded notes and fingerings are the same for both the F-sharp and G-flat major scales, only the names of the notes change. This is also true for C-sharp relative to D-flat major. What we are talking about is called enharmonic spelling. This is when one scale has the ability to be written in two different key signatures. In other words, for both of the examples above we really have a single major scale that can be written two different ways.

      Best,
      ~SW

    • Alexis
      January 12, 2017 at 6:08 pm

      What are the fingering for c flat major scale on trumpet

      • February 6, 2017 at 8:03 am

        Alexis,

        The key of C-flat Major is not used in practice although as a key signature it does exist in theory. This key requires the use of double flats and for this reason it is not used by publishers and music composers. I recommend that you focus on the key of B-flat Major, as these are the same sounded pitches and fingerings, spelled enharmonically.

        Best,
        ~SW

  10. Joshua Williams
    August 15, 2016 at 11:49 am

    Hi, this is great work here, Thanks a ton for all the information you’ve provided. i have a simple question, so to say a doubt that’s been in my mind for long. How do you determine the type of mouthpiece to be used, can the higher registries be achieved using the same mouth piece that you use for the lows. What are the types that i should carry with me. I know there’s a lot like 3c, 5c, 7c etc. but whats the most common. I use a generic trumpet that’s really hard to blow. the mouthpiece does not have a marking in it to say which one it is. what would you recommend me to use. i could probably buy the ones you recommend from amazon. Looking forward to your reply. Thanks

    • August 18, 2016 at 8:42 am

      Hi Joshua,
      You have great questions! While advanced players sometimes switch mouthpieces for different styles (particularly a shallow cup and large backbore/open throat for lead type playing ie. loud, high, & also heavily articulated), I recommend that most players find one mouthpiece that suits them well for ‘all around’ playing. You should be able to increase your register, flexibility, and endurance on any comfortable mouthpiece that you choose. You will not need a high register or low register specific mouthpiece. Bach’s sizes 3C, 5C, and 7C are all good starting sizes and preferable to a ‘no name’ brand or unknown size.
      There is no one recipe for mouthpiece success, check out this video of a concert E-flat arpeggio, played on a Bach 2C mpc (fairly large): https://www.facebook.com/scottwebbermusic/videos/1116782108339794/.
      Bottom line – I’d advise you to try some various sizes and brands in order to choose which one works best. There is an investment in this process that requires some time & cash or getting with someone who will share their mouthpiece collection with you. Hope this helps you out!
      Regards,
      ~SW

  11. Tobi
    April 3, 2016 at 5:34 pm

    Thank you so much sir

  12. degraft asante
    March 7, 2016 at 4:57 am

    Please my name is De-graft and this is my first year of playing the trumpet and this is not what my tutors taught me so i am wondering who is right here.

    • March 28, 2016 at 7:29 am

      These fingerings are correct! I’ve updated this page to include two octaves of some of the scales. Keep practicing, you’ll figure it out! ~SW

  13. Niyah Ward
    March 2, 2016 at 8:56 pm

    What is the second octave trumpet fingerlings for the D major scale?

    • March 28, 2016 at 7:38 am

      Hi Niyah, thanks for the question. As you’ll see below, the fingerings for the second octave are almost identical to the first! Hope this helps and keep making music! ~SW

      D / E / F# / G / A / B / C# / D
      xox / xxo / oxo / ooo / xxo / oxo / xxo / xoo (lower octave)
      xoo / ooo / oxo / ooo / xxo / oxo / xxo / xoo (upper octave)

  14. February 9, 2016 at 6:42 am

    You are welcome! Keep practicing! -SW

  15. Evan
    January 26, 2016 at 10:44 am

    Hi Scott – on the Ab major scale… is the fingering for Db correct? I have in my notes that it is Db is xxx (you have xxo), but perhaps I have written it down incorrectly?? Just want to double check before I change my notes. Thank you!

    • January 26, 2016 at 10:57 am

      The fingerings I provided are for the next octave up from where you are playing. Here is Ab Major on the staff
      Ab / Bb / C / Db / Eb / F / G / Ab
      oxx / xoo / ooo / xxx / oxx / xoo / ooo / oxx

      All the best,
      Scott Webber

  16. Precious Tamms
    January 15, 2016 at 3:02 am

    i’m precious, i appreciate this useful thread which is of great help to youngsters, please is the fingering applicable to valve trombone, euphonium, french horn and other valve instruments?

    • February 9, 2016 at 6:44 am

      I can’t say for sure, I know some of the fingerings are similar but each instrument has its’ own specific technical needs. Thanks for your question, -SW

  17. Faith
    January 12, 2016 at 3:57 pm

    Hey do you have the arpeggios for the scales too??

  18. November 7, 2015 at 12:54 pm

    Thanks this helps a lot!!

  19. rshagisultanov@cherrycreekschools.org
    November 1, 2015 at 3:55 pm

    Thank you, I am glad I found this.

  20. Joshua Locke
    October 25, 2015 at 4:43 am

    Hi Scott, my name is Joshua, I’ve been playing my trumpet for about 3-4 years ( I started in year 4, I’m in year 7 now as of 2015) I am doing quite well but my teacher and my other band teachers say I’m a great trumpet player but I need to kinda loosen up (shoulders down, tight and tense lips etc.) so I was wondering…. any tips?
    Also I am now in a top tier band and I need to be able go all the way up to about a B on top of the treble bar line, any more tips?
    Last question, My (all of them!) teacher(s) say I need to work on my positioning of my mouthpiece on my mouth (forgot what it’s called!) my mouthpiece is kinda on my right side of my lips, i either want it to be in the middle or just closer to the middle of my mouth, any tips?
    Thanks,
    Josh

  21. Jose
    October 1, 2015 at 7:47 am

    Hi Scott my name is Jose and I am learing the trumpets notes my band teacher said that I need to know the names first then the fingerlings any can I have any tips. Thanks

    • October 4, 2015 at 7:30 pm

      There are many ways to learn note names and fingerings together. One way is to make flashcards. Another way is to hold your trumpet and finger each note while saying the note name out loud (rather than playing through the mouthpiece). Start small, memorize one note and name and then add the next, then practice three. Soon you’ll be able to add the fourth, fifth, and sixth notes for memory with ease. Do this with each major and minor scale and be well on your way to being a great player! Best to you and keep practicing! SW

  22. Barrett Mederos
    September 8, 2015 at 6:09 pm

    Hello Scott, my name is Barrett and i always have brain farts about my 12 major scales and this guide helped me a lot with it thank you 🙂

    • September 25, 2015 at 10:20 am

      Your welcome and God bless! ~SW

    • October 4, 2015 at 4:33 pm

      This article is very helpful. I am 11 years old and this has helped me boost my rankings. Now I am in second chair (I used to be 4 chair).

      • October 4, 2015 at 7:34 pm

        Destany, Awesome! Please keep on practicing and playing, it is a gift that you should never give up. Thanks for such great news! ~SW

  23. Ariana
    August 12, 2015 at 1:22 pm

    Hi. My name is Ariana and I’m going into grade 8. This is my second year playing trumpet and I have to say, I really am enjoying it. It gives me a challenge. I was at a clinic (An event type thing where teachers and professors and stuff come and give us newbies tips) once with the rest of my band and one of the teachers there told me that it would be a good idea to know all of my scales for high school so I thought “I guess I could work on that over the summer, sounds like a good idea.” So I just got back from a vacation with my family and now I’m here on your website. It all seems a bit daunting, 12 scales. I’m just wondering what you’d recommend that I start with. Also, keep in mind that I have braces, (which will be on for another year). I already know C major and a couple of other notes all from different scales.
    Thank you so much for your time,
    Ariana

    • September 25, 2015 at 10:34 am

      Thanks for the comment, start with these keys: C, G, D; then F, Bb, and Eb (Major). Remember to listen to great trumpet players both recorded and live! Best, ~SW

  24. Christiaan
    June 8, 2015 at 7:00 am

    Hi SW, my name is Christiaan. U am playing a musical practical next week and am struggeling to remember my fingering for the scales… How can i learn them more effieciently… If i practice for too long my lips becomes sawr… Is there any other way i can learn them?
    Thanks
    Christiaan

    • September 25, 2015 at 10:36 am

      Christian! Thanks for the comment. Yes you can practice without getting sore just by banging the valves down as you move from one note to the next in time with the fingerings of the song you’re learning. This is a great way to practice while giving your lips a break. God bless and all the best, ~SW

    • February 9, 2016 at 6:42 am

      Great, good luck! -SW

  25. Sarah Mejicanos
    June 6, 2015 at 10:29 pm

    Hey thank you for posting this! I Just got a trumpet today from the thrift store. I’ve been playing flute for 4 years now, and i was wondering if you have any advice for me. I wanted to learn trumpet, because I’m big into ska, but now that I have one, I don’t know how to start! Thank you!

    • September 25, 2015 at 10:37 am

      You’ve got plenty of music experience, just listen to trumpet recordings to focus in on the unique trumpet sound. Different from the flute but equally beautiful in my bias opinion! Thanks for the comment, ~SW

  26. Jessica
    May 14, 2015 at 12:51 pm

    This has really helped but do you have any tips on how to hit the high notes.? They wont come out

    • September 25, 2015 at 10:43 am

      Give yourself lots of rest and remember to use the least amount of pressure possible as you increase your pitch moving to higher and higher notes. Also remember to release air through your embouchure slowly and with warmth even for the highest notes. Keep practicing, you’ll get there! ~SW

  27. May 1, 2015 at 11:12 pm

    Hello Scott my name is Samuel but you can call me Sam currently the highest note I can play is a B above the scale and I need to improve the sound my sound start to strain when I play G above the scale and I want it to sound fat I can play it loud just not fat do you have any advice so I can improve.

    • September 25, 2015 at 10:23 am

      Great question but hard to answer without seeing if your embouchure is properly set-up. My best advice is to release the air more slowly! Even when playing loud, trying to get the most sound with the most balances air stream is critical. Ask your local trumpet teacher more about this and God bless, ~SW

  28. Vernon
    April 25, 2015 at 1:54 pm

    Hi Scott! You are very help to us all in regard to learning to play and develop as Trumpetiers. I wanted to ask how I can improve my breathing? I feel as though I am out of breath and my lips get tired quick. Do you have any tips?

    • September 25, 2015 at 10:21 am

      Keep practicing and listen to the greats: Louis Armstrong, Maurice Andre, Wynton Marsalis… there are many others! Best, ~SW

  29. Raymond appiah
    April 24, 2015 at 5:05 am

    hi i want u to make some video for us

  30. Raymond appiah
    April 24, 2015 at 4:58 am

    am very happy

  31. Paul Sun
    April 15, 2015 at 10:13 pm

    Hi, Scott

    I’m turning 70 this November, and I’m taking a trumpet class at the local junior college. Everything is going on pretty well, but we are getting close to the finals and the professor wants us to play the C Major Scale ( concert Bb major)…

    I have read read all of the tips regarding how when playing a trumpet is comes out b flat, and to compensate and play like the sound of a piano, we need to play up 2 notes or down two notes. Does that mean we should forget all about our original fingering and move every note in a piece of music up? I’m totally confused. Please help..

    Paul

    • April 16, 2015 at 7:53 am

      Paul,
      Thanks for the comment, I imagine that the professor wants you to play a written C major scale (no sharps, no flats). Changing the notes in the manner you described is known as transposing and is only necessary for expert players under special circumstances. Your professor can help you learn how to identify written music that is right for your B-flat trumpet. The next step would be to learn to identify and read music written for other instruments using transposition. I hope that helps you out. Remember to breath deeply and release a warm slow air stream through your mouthpiece, all the best! ~SW

  32. Jacques
    April 7, 2015 at 2:44 am

    I’m 74 years old and want to play a trumpet = vintage Boosey & Hawkes Regent – but wonder whether my old lips will manage the higher notes. Could I play almost anything if I can reach the F at top of the stave?

    • April 9, 2015 at 8:48 pm

      Sure, if you focus on keeping your lips soft in the middle as well as applying a “musical” air stream to your playing, then the sky is the limit!

  33. David Thomas
    March 22, 2015 at 3:00 am

    Hi, My name is David ,I understand that the trumpet is a transposing instrument, and if you wanted to play the same note on the trumpet and the piano at the same time you have to play the trumpet in the written B flat on the trumpet, do you mean you would have to play it in its natural resonant note or as the transposition chart states in the note ;D; as there is no written note B flat. thanks regards David.

    • March 23, 2015 at 12:59 pm

      Here is the information that you are looking for:

      The b-flat trumpet is a transposing instrument, it’s designed so that written pitches are not the same as written pitches for let’s say, the piano. On the piano, written pitch and concert pitch are the same. So a written ‘C’ is also a sounded ‘C’. The written pitch of ‘C’ sounds as a ‘Bb’ on a “B-flat” instrument. Sounded pitches always refer to the name of the given pitch as if it were being played on a concert instrument. Remember that on a concert instrument, written ‘C’ and sounded ‘C’ are the same; this is where we get the concept of ‘sounded’ versus ‘concert’ pitch.

      Examples:
      b-flat tenor saxophone – Written pitch: C, sounded pitch: Bb
      e-flat alto saxophone – Written pitch: C, sounded pitch: Eb
      piano, guitar, or c flute – Written pitch: C, sounded pitch: C

      All the best with you studies!
      -SW

  34. Erik Moglia
    January 4, 2015 at 12:06 pm

    Hi, I am in 10th grade and I am trying to learn Trumpeter’s Lullaby by Leroy Anderson on the B flat trumpet. I have been playing since 4th grade. Any tips

    • January 6, 2015 at 8:52 am

      My best advice is to listen to as many different recordings of this tune as possible. This will help you to connect with the different musical choices that artists have made while playing the same work. This will also give you a chance to think about tone quality and getting great “trumpet sound”

  35. rahul
    December 31, 2014 at 4:01 am

    sir because of you nw we could learn more about trumpet sir can u plz teach more about trumpet professional playing style..

  36. December 27, 2014 at 7:18 am

    Hello Scott, I’m 66 years old and newly retired. I have a pocket trumpet that I would like to learn to play. Is there a trick to prizing the scales fingering or is it just rote repetition?
    Thanks again Peter

    • December 27, 2014 at 12:02 pm

      Practice, practice, and more practice my friend! I recommend learning the C major scale first. Get it to where you can play one octave up and down (quarter note = 66bpm or so) before you move onto the other major scales. Try to hear the notes in your head before they come out, “Do, re, mi, …” and so on. Learn the scales in the order of the circle of fifths rather than in the order listed above. For example, a major fifth from C is G, so after C Major scale would come G Major scale (one sharp, F#), next comes D Major (two sharps, F# + C#) and so on and so forth. Thanks for stopping by! -SW

  37. hunter
    December 26, 2014 at 10:26 am

    i has wondering if you could help me play the trumpet because i just got one for christmas and i play the
    french horn ._. And i am only in middle school and i want to do the trumpet for marching band in high school next year

  38. November 28, 2014 at 8:29 am

    Please I dint know how to pitch high notes can I have a little guide

  39. Precious
    November 18, 2014 at 9:59 am

    Wow,thnks 4 dis….

  40. Cristian
    November 2, 2014 at 3:59 pm

    Hey I have a B flat trumpet and I was just wondering: If I’m fingering the C major scale, aren’t I technically playing the B flat major scale? I’ve been trying to wrap my head around this idea but i just want to make sure.

    • November 3, 2014 at 7:59 am

      You’ve got it! The b-flat trumpet is a transposing instrument, it’s designed so that written pitches are not the same as written pitches for let’s say, the piano. On the piano, written pitch and concert pitch are the same. So a written ‘C’ is also a sounded ‘C’. The written pitch of ‘C’ sounds as a ‘Bb’ on a “B-flat” instrument. Sounded pitches always refer to the name of the given pitch as if it were being played on a concert instrument. Remember that on a concert instrument, written ‘C’ and sounded ‘C’ are the same; this is where we get the concept of ‘sounded’ versus ‘concert’ pitch.

      Examples:
      b-flat tenor saxophone – Written pitch: C, sounded pitch: Bb
      e-flat alto saxophone – Written pitch: C, sounded pitch: Eb
      piano, guitar, or c flute – Written pitch: C, sounded pitch: C

      All the best with you studies!
      -SW

  41. Ben lavito
    October 19, 2014 at 4:28 pm

    Wow thanks brother

  42. Agerl Meshack
    October 5, 2014 at 12:34 pm

    Keep the good work going. Thanks for the guide.

    • October 5, 2014 at 12:45 pm

      Your very welcome, I’ll have more trumpet lessons and tutorials posted soon so stop by anytime! -SW

    • Xandria
      October 9, 2014 at 1:10 pm

      Thanks sooo much!!!!!! Your website for fellow trumpeters like me has helped me improve my skills!!! You are so helpful!

      • October 9, 2014 at 1:21 pm

        Glad to help others make music! Thanks so much for your kind words. -SW

  43. Mike
    September 7, 2014 at 11:49 am

    Thanks man…will lik you to give me some solo solfa notes…thanks…my email-mikadel4u@gmail.com

    • September 7, 2014 at 12:50 pm

      I didn’t understand exactly what you’d like for me to send you, I’m happy to be of assistance, would you be willing to clarify the request for me? Thanks and all the best, SW

  44. September 2, 2014 at 6:30 am

    This is wonderful Thanks alot for this great work

    • September 2, 2014 at 9:46 am

      I appreciate your comment very much sir, thanks for stopping by! -SW

  45. August 31, 2014 at 3:29 am

    Great stuff!!! Good for dummies.

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Scott Webber